Presidential Race Maps Writing on the Wall
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/images/jivy/map_titles/1.gif Today’s Map Today monitors the current status of the race.
Roll over a state for poll averages, click for commentary.
Basemap
AL
9
AK
3
AZ
11
AR
6
CA
55
CO
9
CT
7
DE
3
DC
3
FL
29
GA
16
HI
4
ID
4
IL
20
IN
11
IA
6
KS
6
KY
8
LA
8
ME
3
MD
10
MA
11
MI
16
MN
10
MS
6
MO
10
MT
3
NE
5
NV
6
NH
4
NJ
14
NM
5
NY
29
NC
15
ND
3
OH
18
OK
7
OR
7
PA
20
RI
4
SC
9
SD
3
TN
11
TX
38
UT
6
VT
3
VA
13
WV
5
WI
10
WY
3
ME2
1

270 Needed to Win.

Toss Up
Total 0
Unclear Too close to call 0
Hilary Clinton (Democrat)
Total 322
Democratic Safe 203
Leaning_democratic Leaning 119
Donald Trump (Republican)
Total 216
Republican Safe 143
Leaning_republican Leaning 73
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Gallup: Race A Neutral Factor In This Election?

Posted Oct 10, 2008 at 1:46 AM by Maurice Berger

In what may rank as one of the odder observations by a pollster in this cycle, Gallup reports the following: "While 6% of voters say they are less likely to vote for Barack Obama because of his race, 9% say they are more likely to vote for him, making the impact of his race a neutral to slightly positive factor when all voters' self-reported attitudes are taken into account." Polltrack would like to know: since when do people "self-report" racial prejudice, something implied in an affirmative answer to Gallup's question? While race and racism may not determine the outcome of this election, Gallup's conclusion, that racial prejudice does not appear to hurt Obama, disregards the unconscious and complex nature of our attitudes about race--the anxiety, ambivalence, and confusion that inflects our view of racial difference. (Indeed, scores of studies have examined the psycho-social impulse to conceal from public view racial anxiety or animus.) This is why PollTrack continually cautions against interpreting public opinion through pure numbers or numerical formulas. What sometimes gets left out in pollster's findings is the gray area that makes public opinion fluid, nuanced, and sometimes hard to pin down.