Presidential Race Maps Writing on the Wall
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/images/jivy/map_titles/1.gif Today’s Map Today monitors the current status of the race.
Roll over a state for poll averages, click for commentary.
Basemap
AL
9
AK
3
AZ
11
AR
6
CA
55
CO
9
CT
7
DE
3
DC
3
FL
29
GA
16
HI
4
ID
4
IL
20
IN
11
IA
6
KS
6
KY
8
LA
8
ME
3
MD
10
MA
11
MI
16
MN
10
MS
6
MO
10
MT
3
NE
5
NV
6
NH
4
NJ
14
NM
5
NY
29
NC
15
ND
3
OH
18
OK
7
OR
7
PA
20
RI
4
SC
9
SD
3
TN
11
TX
38
UT
6
VT
3
VA
13
WV
5
WI
10
WY
3
ME2
1

270 Needed to Win.

Toss Up
Total 0
Unclear Too close to call 0
Hilary Clinton (Democrat)
Total 322
Democratic Safe 203
Leaning_democratic Leaning 119
Donald Trump (Republican)
Total 216
Republican Safe 143
Leaning_republican Leaning 73
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CNN + Rasmussen: The "Bounce" May Be Gone

Posted Sep 01, 2008 at 1:32 AM by Maurice Berger

A new CNN/Opinion Research poll taken entire after the Democratic National Convention suggests that the race between Obama and McCain is exactly as was before the convention: tied. According to the new poll, Obama leads by one point, 49% to 48%. Yesterday and today, Rasmussen's daily tracker observes a similar contraction to pre-convention numbers. So any "bounce" in public opinion generated by Denver appears to have evaporated.

The reason: it's likely the the rapid fire succession of the two VP announcements and conventions--the latter a few days apart rather than three to four weeks apart, timing that has occurred only a few other times in the history of the two parties--has made it difficult for the Democrats to sustain their "bounce." Further complicating things for Obama is the popularity of Sarah Palin among Christian conservatives, a nomination that has now pushed McCain's Republican party support to well over 90%.

The "bounce" generated by the DNC may have been canceled out by the buzz generated by McCain's announcement of his running mate. Writes CNN pollster Keating Holland: "The convention -- and particularly Obama's speech -- seems to be well-received. And the selection of Sarah Palin as the GOP running mate, also seems to be well-received. So why is the race still a virtual tie? Probably because the two events created equal and opposite bounces --assuming that either one created a bounce at all."